Pottermore, PoA Chapter 15 (what I’ve found so far…)

DISCLAIMER: This is not exactly a live blog and it’s definitely not a Finder’s Guide. It’s what I’ve found so far. There’s also probably some stuff I’m missing. :)

Here’s what I’ve found so far (DO NOT READ IF YOU DO NOT WANT TO BE SPOILED!)…

CHAPTER 10: THE QUIDDITCH FINAL

Scene 1 (“Gryffindor Wins the Cup”)

  • Zoom 1:
    • Nice artwork with Harry lifting the Quidditch Cup, banners waving, and streamers coming down.
    • COLLECT binoculars from the Gryffindor female in back of the waving Gryffindor arm.
  • Zoom 2:
    • COLLECT 5 Galleons – from the stands to the right.
    • COLLECT Chocolate Frog Card for Leopoldina Smethwyck (the first British witch to referee Quidditch) – from further down the field past the waving banner to the left.

Okay… so where is the Wolfsbane Dust Chocolate Frog Card that I’m hearing about?

Key to Zoom Levels:
I am using the conventions I’ve seen used elsewhere when discussing Pottermore zoom levels:

    • Zoom 1 = the original zoom level.
    • Zoom 2 = zoom in one level from Zoom 1.
    • Zoom 3 = zoom in two levels from Zoom 1.
    • Zoom OUT 2 = zoom out one level from Zoom 1.
    • Zoom OUT 3 = zoom out two levels from Zoom 1.

Pottermore, PoA Chapter 13 (what I’ve found so far…)

DISCLAIMER: This is not exactly a live blog and it’s definitely not a Finder’s Guide. It’s what I’ve found so far. There’s also probably some stuff I’m missing. :)

Here’s what I’ve found so far (DO NOT READ IF YOU DO NOT WANT TO BE SPOILED!)…

CHAPTER 13: GRYFFINDOR VERSUS RAVENCLAW

Scene 1 (“Ron Tries Out the Firebolt”)

  • Zoom 1:
    • COLLECT Dried Nettles – from the far end of the Quidditch Pitch.
    • COLLECT a Galleon – in back of the sleeping person (I assume this is Madam Hooch?). You can get Madam Hooch to snore by moving your cursor.
    • COLLECT a Chocolate Frog Card for Cyprian Youdle (the only referee ever to die during a Quidditch match – killed by a curse) – on the ground in the front row of the stands.
    • From the Comments:
      • COLLECT a Bertie Bott’s Grass-Flavoured Bean – from the grass between the two nearest posts. (Thanks, Annie!)
  • Zoom 2:
    • Move your cursor to help Ron fly Harry’s thunderbolt. At one point, you can even get him to loop-the-loop through one of the goalposts!
    • UNLOCK “The Firebolt” (JKR-Exclusive Content) by clicking on the third goalpost. This is fantastic information about Harry’s broom!

Scene 2 (“A Rude Awakening”)

  • Zoom 1:
    • Another delightful Stephen Fry or Jim Dale audio reading, complete with the McGonnagall voice.
    • COLLECT a Chocolate Frog Card for Alberic Grunnion (inventor of the dungbomb) – next to the trunk at the foot of the bed.
    • COLLECT Toothflossing Stringmints (for your dental hygiene needs) – from the left side of the trunk.
    • Move cursor to make the green thing move and make noise. (Does anybody know what this thing is called?).
      • From the Comments: It’s apparently a fanged frisbee nibbling on the paper. (Thanks, Sara!)
  • Zoom 2:
    • Moves the scene to the left. I’m not finding anything to collect here. I hope commenters find something!
  • Zoom 3:
    • Zooms the cursor IN.
    • Move cursor to middle bed to watch the scarlet Gryffindor bed curtains fall.
    • COLLECT a galleon – from the trunk at the foot of the bed to the left.
    • COLLECT  dungbomb (Peeves will be so thrilled!) – from the top of the chest next to the bed to the right.
  • Double-clicking after this just reverses the zoom levels.

Key to Zoom Levels:
I am using the conventions I’ve seen used elsewhere when discussing Pottermore zoom levels:

    • Zoom 1 = the original zoom level.
    • Zoom 2 = zoom in one level from Zoom 1.
    • Zoom 3 = zoom in two levels from Zoom 1.
    • Zoom OUT 2 = zoom out one level from Zoom 1.
    • Zoom OUT 3 = zoom out two levels from Zoom 1.

Pottermore, PoA Chapter 9 (what I’ve found so far…)

DISCLAIMER: This is not exactly a live blog and it’s definitely not a Finder’s Guide. It’s what I’ve found so far. There’s also probably some stuff I’m missing. :)

Here’s what I’ve found so far (DO NOT READ IF YOU DO NOT WANT TO BE SPOILED!)…

CHAPTER 9: GRIM DEFEAT

Scene 1 (“Gryffindor Versus Hufflepuff”)

  • Zoom 1:
    • Dementor voices and rain noises. See Dementors on the ground looking up at Harry. I don’t think there’s anything to find here.
  • Zoom 2 (pulls back and moves frame up into the sky):
    • Stephen Fry or Jim Dale reads the scene from the audiobook. Selection ends with Harry remembering his mother’s scream.
    • Move cursor to get Harry to chase the snitch.

That’s all! There does not appear to be anything to collect in this chapter.

Key to Zoom Levels:
I am using the conventions I’ve seen used elsewhere when discussing Pottermore zoom levels:

  • Zoom 1 = the original zoom level.
  • Zoom 2 = zoom in one level from Zoom 1.
  • Zoom 3 = zoom in two levels from Zoom 1.
  • Zoom OUT 2 = zoom out one level from Zoom 1.
  • Zoom OUT 3 = zoom out two levels from Zoom 1.

Pottermore, CoS Chapter 10 (what I’ve found so far…)

DISCLAIMER: This is not exactly a live blog and it’s definitely not a Finder’s Guide. It’s what I’ve found so far. There’s also probably some stuff I’m missing. :)

Here’s what I’ve found so far (DO NOT READ IF YOU DO NOT WANT TO BE SPOILED!)…

CHAPTER 10: THE ROGUE BLUDGER

Scene 1 (“Moste Potent Potions”)
The key to zoom levels can be found at the bottom of the post.

  • Zoom 1 – COLLECT Moste Potent Potions. (I hope this means we get to learn how to do Polyjuice Potion!).
  • Zoom-OUT 2:
    • Make the desk drawer open
    • COLLECT a Bertie Bott’s Curry-Flavoured Bean
    • COLLECT the Beatrix Bloxom Chocolate Frog Card (author of The Toadstool Tales, which were banned because they caused nausea and vomiting – presumably because they were so… well… read it yourself) :)
    • From the Comments – COLLECT a Bertie Bott’s Cocoanut-Flavoured Bean. (Thanks, Let’s Call Me Lily!)

Scene 2 (“Harry’s Broken Arm”)
The key to zoom levels can be found at the bottom of the post.

  • Zoom 1 – Sets the scene.
  • Zoom 2 (and additional zooms) – Move Harry closer by zooming or double-clicking repeatedly
  • COLLECT “Draco Malfoy” (JKR Exclusive Content). I’m not sure at what Zoom level you find this one because I collected originally collected it on Slytherin’s prize day and so it was already open for me.

Scene 3 (“Colin is Petrified”)
The key to zoom levels can be found at the bottom of the post.

  • Zoom 1 – Nice eerie night-time scene in the Hospital Wing.
  • Zoom 2:
    • COLLECT Poppy heads
    • COLLECT the Merwyn the Malicious Chocolate Frog Card
    • COLLECT a Sponge
    • Move cursor around to make the film in Colin Creevey’s camera – in Dumbledore’s hands – sizzle. (Thanks hc and Jerri for reminding me that the thing Dumbledore is holding is Colin’s camera!)

Key to Zoom Levels:
I am using the conventions I’ve seen used elsewhere when discussing Pottermore zoom levels:

  • Zoom 1 = the original zoom level.
  • Zoom 2 = zoom in one level from Zoom 1.
  • Zoom 3 = zoom in two levels from Zoom 1.
  • Zoom OUT 2 = zoom out one level from Zoom 1.
  • Zoom OUT 3 = zoom out two levels from Zoom 1.

Pottermore, CoS Chapter 7 (what I’ve found so far…)

DISCLAIMER: This is not exactly a live blog and it’s definitely not a Finder’s Guide. It’s what I’ve found so far. There’s also probably some stuff I’m missing. :)

Here’s what I’ve found so far (DO NOT READ IF YOU DO NOT WANT TO BE SPOILED!)…

CHAPTER 7: MUDBLOODS AND MURMERS

Scene 1 (“Quidditch Practice”) – only 1 zoom
Watch Ron spit up slugs. YUCK!!! Some slugs move.

  • UNLOCK “Pure-Blood” (Exclusive JKR content)
  • CLICK for a closer look at Professor Snape’s letter (and handwriting!) giving Slytherin permission to use the pitch to train the new seeker.
  • COLLECT Knotgrass.
  • As Marina pointed out in the Comments, you can also COLLECT a Horned Slug. I think you need to wait a minute, though, before it shows up as collectible (at least that’s how it worked for me). :)
  • As Let’s Call Me Lily pointed out in the Comments, you can also COLLECT a Chocolate Frog Card next to the Slytherin boy’s foot. (I actually found this while showing my husband the scene, but thanks again Let’s Call Me Lily!). The Card is for Bowman Wright, metal charmer and inventor of the Golden Snitch.

Scene 2 (“Lockhart’s Office”)
The key to zoom levels can be found at the bottom of the post.

  • Zoom 1:
    • COLLECT a Signed Photo of Gilderoy Lockhart!!!!! (and hear him laugh)
    • COLLECT a bottle of Lilac ink
    • COLLECT a Peacock Quill
    • Make applause sound, hear Lockhart laugh, make one of the paintings move
    • Double-click to make day turn to night, to make it turn later (and see the envelopes pile higher)
    • From the Comments – COLLECT a Chocolate Frog Card next to Lockhart’s foot. (Thanks, christy!). The card is for Bridget Wenlock, the great Hufflepuff Arithmancer who discovered the magical properties of the Number 7.

Key to Zoom Levels:
I am using the conventions I’ve seen used elsewhere when discussing Pottermore zoom levels:

  • Zoom 1 = the original zoom level.
  • Zoom 2 = zoom in one level from Zoom 1.
  • Zoom 3 = zoom in two levels from Zoom 1.
  • Zoom OUT 2 = zoom out one level from Zoom 1.
  • Zoom OUT 3 = zoom out two levels from Zoom 1.

Guest Post: Draco dormiens nunquam titillandusa

by AnnieLogic

Guest blogger AnnieLogic provides a nice counterbalance to my much less favorable review of Draco’s first encounter with Harry Potter…

Draco holds a distinction: he is the first notable character to attempt to befriend Harry, while being unaware of the celebrity beside him. In fact, Draco tries to make small talk with Harry, while the latter is wearing scruffy hand-me-down Muggle clothes and a very obvious patch-up job on his broken glasses. Draco does not appear to snub Harry from the initial outset for the sake of appearances.

Yet Draco’s conduct and manner of address – notably in regards to his parents and how he intends to get his own way – remind Harry strongly of his cousin. These memories of Dudley, complete with a conglomerate of negative feelings associated with them, mean that Harry may be projecting onto an unfamiliar person. It provides wriggle room for a misunderstanding early on.

Due to feeling increasingly stupid about his lack of knowledge concerning the Wizarding World, Harry becomes uncomfortable at Draco’s enthusiastic talk of Quidditch and Hogwarts’ Houses. Even Hagrid (who, unlike Draco, knew how much in the dark the Dursley’s had condemned Harry to be) exclaimed later:

“Blimey, Harry, I keep forgettin’ how little yeh know — not knowin’ about Quidditch!”

Later the reader sees further that students place Hogwarts Houses – as well as the much-loved Wizarding sport, Quidditch – at the forefront of their minds, so Draco’s choice of a conversational subject was seemingly friendly and no different than that of other future students, or indeed adults.

The downward spiral continues as Draco talks disdainfully of Hagrid. Understandably, and compassionately, Harry is defensive of his first wizarding friend – who showed him kindness, generosity and acceptance. This trait of Draco’s – to belittle and taunt those he believes to be his inferiors – is exhibited in various topics throughout the first year: topics concerning family, social status, intellect and skill, wealth and provisions:

“I do feel so sorry,” said Draco Malfoy, one Potions class, “for all those people who have to stay at Hogwarts for Christmas because they’re not wanted at home.”


“Would you mind moving out of the way?” came Malfoy’s cold drawl from behind them. “Are you trying to earn some extra money, Weasley? Hoping to be gamekeeper yourself when you leave Hogwarts, I suppose — that hut of Hagrid’s must seem like a palace compared to what your family’s used to.”


“See, there’s Potter, who’s got no parents, then there’s the Weasleys, who’ve got no money — you should be on the team, Longbottom, you’ve got no brains.”


“Longbottom, if brains were gold you’d be poorer than Weasley, and that’s saying something.”

When Harry replies shortly to Draco’s enquiry about his parents, and Draco responds “Oh sorry” (a fairly standard, civil way to reply to a complete stranger), Harry seems to take unnecessary offence, thinking Draco doesn’t sound sorry at all. However, the notion is swiftly dispelled when Draco adds, “But they were our kind, weren’t they?” as if to imply non-magical folk are of scant enough worth to mourn their loss.

Perhaps Draco could have enquired as to what happened, or where and with whom does Harry now live. However, in some circles this would probably be considered extremely intrusive questions to ask a stranger – particularly if the stranger turned abrupt, which would be a warning sign not to delve further into private matters. Re-enforcing this, the reader later observes Molly on the platform scolding the insensitivity of her children – first Ginny, for wanting go look at Harry as if he were a specimen in a zoo; secondly, Fred and George for proposing to ask Harry questions about the fateful circumstances under which he lost his parents.

Draco goes on to express an intolerant view of Muggleborns. Introduced here is another of Draco’s traits: being a constant mouthpiece for his parent’s views, particularly parroting and using the name of his father, Lucius Malfoy, and its weighty lineage.

In Tales of Beedle the Bard, the notes reveal Lucius Malfoy strove to get that very book, which contains Muggle-friendly teachings, banned from the Hogwarts curriculum. This fact allows the reader an insight into how tight a rein Lucius exerted on what Draco was exposed to in his first eleven years. It doesn’t justify or excuse the character, it does however give an idea of how Draco’s personality and morals were strictly influenced and moulded – showing why he chooses to ally and associate with those of desirable profile (in his opinion), who are subservient to his wishes, or who possess suitable beliefs.

The set up for Draco alienating and developing a rivalry with Harry, is repeated when Draco insults and tries to trump Ron, and a newly developed bond, despite it being a retaliation to a veiled snigger at his name.

Throughout the story, in a developing pattern of animosity, Draco slowly descends from snotty spoiled child further into the bully and antagonist role.

AnnieLogic authors the LiveJournal custos noctis.

The Filius Charm

They reached the end of the passageway and saw before them a brilliantly lit chamber, its ceiling arching high above them. It was full of small, jewel-bright birds, fluttering and tumbling all around the room. On the opposite side of the chamber was a heavy wooden door.

“Do you think they’ll attack us if we cross the room?” said Ron.

“Probably,” said Harry. “They don’t look very vicious, but I suppose if they all swooped down at once…”

The Trio have now reached Professor Flitwick’s protection for the Stone, a protection involving keys that have been charmed to behave like a flock of birds.

Filius Flitwick

We have briefly met Professor Flitwick in the classroom. When he first reads Harry Potter’s name on his roll sheet, he squeaks and tumbles out of view. On Halloween, while Hermione famously pesters Ron over the proper way to say “Wingardium Leviosa,” Flitwick claps his hands and cries “Well done!” after she successfully levitates a feather four feet into the air.

Flitwick could not even contain himself from confiding in Hermione that she had received 112% on his exam. And this information – coming on the day that the Trio decide to go through the trapdoor – leads Hermione to conclude that (in terms of potential expulsion, at least), it is positively safe for her to go sneaking around the castle after curfew in order to protect the Stone.

Filius Flitwick is an excitable, and rather charming, little man who makes First Year students demonstrate a capacity for making a pineapple tapdance across a desk. But he’s also quite formidable in his own way. He is a retired Dueling Champion and Head of Ravenclaw – meaning that we should expect a certain amount of ingenuity in his protection for the Stone.

The beauty of his protective Charm – aside from the sheer physical beauty of the metallic flock – is that it involves both consideration in working out the task and performance in catching the right key.

In fact, in their initial analysis of the task, Harry and Ron get it all wrong. The keys (which they still think are birds) are not charmed to attack. They are charmed to perform like hundreds of Golden Snitches. That is, they will fly swiftly away from whoever tries to catch them. Consequently, identifying and then catching the right key requires Seeker skills.

The Task

Here’s a short breakdown of the (not-necessarily-sequential) elements involved in the successful performance of this task:

  • To identify the relationship between the winged objects and the door that must be passed through (i.e., recognize that the objects are keys, not birds).
  • To identify the exact key – among hundreds – that must be caught in order to pass through the door.
  • To find and mount a broom – and be a good enough flyer to stay mounted while zooming around trying to catch the right key.
  • To figure out a strategy for catching the key. This final element requires speed, agility, and (in the case of the Trio) teamwork.

The Golden Snitch

As mentioned above, performing this task successfully requires Seeker skills, and (as the text reminds us) it was “not for nothing” that “Harry was the youngest Seeker in a century.”

The entire purpose of Harry’s position at Quidditch is to catch the Golden Snitch. But what exactly is the Snitch?

Okay, we know that it’s a small, winged metal ball. But more than that, it’s a small, winged metal ball that mimics the size, shape, and swift, erratic movements of the Snidget – a bird so fast and so talented at hiding itself from predators that few Muggles have ever seen it. Classified as a Magical Creature, the Snidget has a XXXX MoM rating thanks to the penalties now attached to its capture or injury.

But how and why did those penalties come into existence? Well, around the early 11th century, hunting the elusive bird became a favorite sport among Wizards and Witches. Snidget hunting finally crossed paths with Quidditch in the late 13th century when a Wizarding official released a Snidget into a game of Quidditch. From that time on, the Snidget hunt became a part of the game – excellent for Quidditch, but not so excellent for the small bird.

What happened next is the element that appears to have inspired Filius Flitwick’s Charm. According to Kennilworthy Whisp’s Quidditch through the Ages:

The invention of the Golden Snitch is credited to the wizard Bowman Wright of Godric’s Hollow. While Quidditch teams all over the country tried to find bird substitutes for the Snidget [which was now on the brink of extinction], Wright, who was a skilled metal-charmer, set himself to the task of creating a ball that mimicked the behavior and flight patterns of the Snidget. That he succeeded perfectly is clear from the many rolls of parchment he left behind him on his death (now in the possession of a private collector), listing the orders he had received from all over the country.

Filius Flitwick almost certainly found inspiration for the performance of the enchanted keys in the performance of the Golden Snitch:

[Each of the members of the Trio] seized a broomstick and kicked off into the air, soaring into the midst of the cloud of keys. They grabbed and snatched, but the bewitched keys darted and dived so quickly it was almost impossible to catch one.

We don’t know from the passage if Flitwick gave the keys’ wings the rotational joints found in the wings of Snidgets (and by extension, Snitches), but it seems reasonable to assume that the idea of charming metal to perform like swift, elusive birds (catchable only on broomstick) would be inspired by the greatest of all Wizarding sports.

When Birds Attack!

So let’s go back to the question that Ron asked earlier about whether or not the “birds” would attack. As a consequence of the anxiety his question stirred,

[Harry] took a deep breath, covered his face with his arms, and sprinted across the room. He expected to feel sharp beaks and claws tearing at him any second, but nothing happened.

Compare Ron and Harry’s anxiety with the charmed bird attack that actually does occur in HBP.

In 6th year, when Lavender Brown makes her play for Ron’s affections, Hermione consoles herself in an abandoned classroom by conjuring birds out of thin air… then sets the birds on Ron when he comes into the classroom with Lavender:

Harry spun around to see Hermione pointing her wand at Ron, her expression wild: The little flock of birds was speeding like a hail of fat golden bullets toward Ron, who yelped and covered his face with his hands, but the birds attacked, pecking and clawing at every bit of flesh they could reach.

Given this later incident, I think it rather signficant that it’s Ron who asks in PS/SS if Flitwick’s “birds” will attack. It serves as foreshadowing for that moment nearly 6 years later when a very hurt and jealous Hermione finally does set birds on Ron – birds that she conjured as practice for Flitwick’s NEWT-level Charms class.

So my question is this: When Hermione set those birds on Ron, might she (consciously or unconsciously) have remembered Ron’s concern about being attacked by charmed keys that initially appeared to be birds?

Regardless of the answer to that question, there is nothing vicious about Flitwick’s flock of keys. The Charms protection for the Stone seems (like Flitwick himself) rather more genial than the Devil’s Snare. Yet it still requires considerable thought and skill to achieve a successful outcome – qualities that one would expect from a spell produced by the Head of House for Ravenclaw.